Machete Season

12805848_10153746697424818_6561277175709789453_n

Machete Season

When I was in Uganda in 2017 I got confronted with the Rwandan genocide that took place in 1994. I was particularly shocked by the fact that this conflict could erupt so quickly and easily. Between 800.000 and 1.000.000 million people were slaughtered over the course of 100 days.

Machete Season is about the easiness and accessibility of violence. With this series I want to emphasize that no matter how civilized we think we are, violence and aggressiveness are always lurking around the corner. We should always be aware of this, because those who do not remember history are bound to make the same mistakes again.

I visualized this in these sculptures (15 in total) in two ways. First of all, I made the frames similar to that of toy model airplane kits. Where you simply click each part out of the frame and you’re ready to go. On top of that I used magnets to attach the machetes to the steel frame. So you can simply grab a machete out of the frame. Just like it was that easy to grab a machete from your house and start killing, back in 1994. All of a sudden this piece of art could change into a lethal weapon. You could be a victim, you could even turn into an aggressor.

To make these sculptures I went to Rwanda and Uganda myself to collect the machetes. Each time we bought a bunch of new ones and we started driving around the countryside to exchange new machetes for used ones.

Pictured above is Sculpture #1 (series of 15) of Machete Season. The machete, a popular household tool, was the weapon of choice to kill ‘the cockroaches’: the name that was given to the Tutsi (and moderate Hutu) people. Materials: Metal and authentic Rwandan and Ugandan machetes.

Een gedachte over “Machete Season

  1. Sculpture #1 of ‘Machete Season’: inspired by the Rwandan Genocide 1994 in which, at least, 800.000 men, woman and children were murdered. The machete, a popular household tool, was the weapon of choice to ‘kill the cockroaches’: the name that was given to the Tutsi (and moderate Hutu) people. Materials: Metal and authentic Rwandan and Ugandan machetes.

    Like

Geef een reactie

Vul je gegevens in of klik op een icoon om in te loggen.

WordPress.com logo

Je reageert onder je WordPress.com account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Google photo

Je reageert onder je Google account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Twitter-afbeelding

Je reageert onder je Twitter account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Facebook foto

Je reageert onder je Facebook account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Verbinden met %s